Tuesday Reading

Career Limiting Habits

By: Jim Bruce
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Do You Have One?

Career limiting habits (CLHs) are habits, repeated behaviors that keep us from greater success or enjoyment in our careers.  And, really, in all aspects of our life.  Research has shown that most of us are aware of our career limiting habits but have not made much progress in addressing them.  Why?  Partly because it is really hard, partly because we don’t understand the cause, and partly because the cure we select doesn’t address the real cause.
 

Those Informal Leaders

By: Jim Bruce
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There are informal leaders in every organization.  These are the people in the organization who, without formal title or authority, get things done, and done well, show others how to do them, and have a large network interconnecting many people in a variety of teams and organizations across the entire organization.  Often we do not even know who these people are nor recognize their importance in our organization’s success or understand the breadth of their networks.

 

Coaching? Mentoring?

By: Brian McDonald
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What's the difference?

Someone asked the other day, “What do you think?” and I wondered, is this a time to coach or a time to mentor?  In our interactions everyday we may have the choice to adopt one approach over the other.  Yet we need to be able to make the distinction between coaching in contrast to mentoring.  When is coaching the better path;  when would mentoring be a better option?

Stressed?

By: Jim Bruce
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I suspect that you, like me, must answer “yes.”  From a neuroscience perspective, our brains are constantly, subconsciously scanning the world around us seeking to identify and examine “events” of note – for example, the school bus that went down my street this morning at 

Neuroscience – Managing Self-Talk

By: Jim Bruce
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Earlier this summer we introduced the idea (in a series of Tuesday Readings, as referenced below) that if we understand how our brain works, we can better understand why we react the way we do.  I wrote, then, that the individual’s brain, in the days of our early ancestors, had one key goal – survival, avoiding threats and seeking food (rewards).  And, avoiding threats had a much higher priority with five times more neural networks devoted to threat detection than to identifying rewards. 

 

I Made a Mistake

By: Jim Bruce
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So, what do I do now?

We all make mistakes.  Sometimes they are small and personal like forgetting to put the trash at the curb to be picked up.  Or, larger and embarrassing, like writing the amount differently in numbers and words on a check.  Or, sending a critical email to the wrong addressee.  Or, being the only one to show up for a meeting because you failed to send a notice of the meeting around to the expected attendees.  Or, you crash an application server because you didn’t stop and check the command before you entered it.  Or,

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