Staff Retention: The Power of Appreciation at Work

By: Jim Bruce
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Too often, we take people for granted.  In this week’s Tuesday Reading “Staff Retention:  The Power of Appreciation at Work”, Mike Robbins quotes the U.S. Department of Labor as noting that 64% of Americans who leave their jobs say they do so because they don’t feel appreciated.  And, Gallup reports that 70% of people in the U.S. say they received no praise or recognition in the workplace.  

Taming the Abrasive Manager: Words from the Boss Whisperer

By: Jim Bruce
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Have you ever had a manager who was abrasive on your staff?  You know, the person who causes you headaches, who have aggressive management styles that create interpersonal friction, reduce motivation and trust to rubble, and disrupt work well beyond the group they lead.  In “Taming the Abrasive Manager:  Words from the Boss Whisperer”, Laura Crawshaw, president of the Executive Insight Development Group, has some good words of advice.

Great Leaders Build Off Great Relations

By: Jim Bruce
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During a 2005 guest lecture at MIT’s Sloan School of Management the following question was asked:  “What should you be learning in business school?”  Jack Welch answered:  “Just concentrate on networking.  Everything else you need to know, you can learn on the job.” 

A Roadmap for IT Leadership and the Next Ten Years

By: Jim Bruce
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As it nears the end of the year, it seems appropriate for the Tuesday Reading to turn to the future.  In “A Roadmap for IT Leadership and the Next Ten Years” <http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/EQM0626.pdf> Tim Chester, CIO at Texas A&M at Qatar, argues that the future requires that CIOs and other IT leaders become technology advocates and not leaders of technology mechanics.  So, take a deep breadth, sit back and think carefully about your technology leadership role in the coming years.

Too Few Manners at Work

By: Jim Bruce
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Early last month, I was talking with with a businessman who is now the president of a small college in New York. In the course of our conversation, he noted how rude his faculty were to one another.  I couldn’t help reflecting on the rudeness I had observed among IT staff members during my two decades at CIO -- personal attacks, ignoring colleagues who had a different point of view, dominating conversations, interruptions, and the list goes on.

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